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A Leaders Impact on Company Culture

Does your workplace have a working healthy company culture? Every executive will have a different idea of what exactly company culture means and whether or not it is important.

The belief that most successful people hold is that company culture does indeed play a huge role in the everyday running of businesses. They can see the impact it can have across the board from employee work satisfaction to the values and belief systems a company holds. There is no doubting the benefits of creating a functioning and dynamic culture but who is responsible for it and what impact do they make on it?

Firstly culture is always present in an organisation; it’s about finding someone who improves it. A business is similar to a tree, if the foundation roots are defective, the company will start to weaken. A successful company culture will revitalise the roots cementing a solid base for the future. Once a leader is selected, he or she is responsible for growing and shaping the new culture. Culture aligns a company and its employees, so it is crucial that any adaptation made to the existing culture be beneficial to the whole organisation.

Leaders come in to help shape and stabilise culture. Culture, in turn, shapes leadership. They both drive performance. Leaders have a massive task to build on the foundations roots of the company culture and help strengthen the organisation from the bottom up.

It is up to the leader to articulate, demonstrate and spread the new company culture in a way that is explicit instead of implicit; their commitment must be visible and constantly verbalised. It is the duty of the leader to keep employees energised and engaged through the new culture; they are the branches of the company tree. Without proper and healthy foundations the branches will weaken and fall.

Leaders must answer: “What difference do I want to make?” He or she will have the opportunity to consciously build the culture the way they want from a seemingly blank page. The challenge is continually shaping it to new ideas and standards as the business and its employees change and grow. A healthy corporate culture is one that requires active involvement and constant attention. It is important that leaders stay aligned with the culture especially in the environment they hope to lead.

Leadership, therefore, is a verb, not a noun, it's a continuous action. A leader has a powerful, yet violate job. They must continually do actions that make people want to follow them because if you think you are leading and find you have no followers, you are just taking a walk.

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Be the leader followers want to follow
If you are a leader, it is up to you to create an idyllic business culture. Your leadership will shape the culture as the company and its employees grow. Steer towards the right decisions that will set the right tone and image of your business. Identify when there is a need to update and adapt aspects of the culture, don’t be afraid of change. Be responsible for creating the most dynamic environment for the company’s tree to not only grow but thrive! Remember your actions affect a whole organisation not just yourself.

Does your current culture need re-shaping in 2017?

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